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Public Benefit

Harrow's 16th-century Royal Charter states the School's objects as the 'bringing up, teaching and instruction of children and youth in grammar', such that those young people give 'a very good example to all others to imitate the like hereafter, and also to the common profit of all our subjects'.

As a charity, we remain mindful of this commitment to public benefit by working to fulfil four charitable aims.

 

1.  To provide educational facilities to members of local schools and to other members of the community, so far as is consistent with the above aims.

The School runs over 150 projects and partnerships with local schools and community groups. To see a growing list of case studies, visit the Harrow School profile on the Independent Schools Council's website, Schools Together. Harrow’s philanthropic, charitable, outreach and partnership work is central to Harrow School life and is referred to as Shaftesbury Enterprise. Through this initiative, Harrow engages purposefully and genuinely with the local community and beyond, in the spirit of the 19th-century reformer, philanthropist and Old Harrovian, the 7th Earl of Shaftesbury. Our first annual report serves as a snapshot of the work that we are doing as a School and can be found here.

2. To widen access by increasing bursary funding.

Bursary funding supports several pupils who would not otherwise be able to afford the School’s fees. In 2016/17 (our most recently published accounts), 86 pupils benefited from bursaries amounting to £2,050,000. Of these awards, 28 attracted remission of at least 95% and a further 45 attracted remission of between 50% and 95%. We continue to increase the funding available for  bursaries, especially through income from the Harrow International Schools and through donations made via the Harrow Development Trust.

 

3. To provide an independent secondary education of very high quality which maximises each pupil’s potential and lifelong interests to the benefit of the wider community.

A number of Harrow’s former pupils have gone on to make significant contributions to society. Details of many of them can be found here, in the appendix of The Timeline History of Harrow School by Dale Vargas (Druries 1952³) and in Mr Vargas' latest publication, 101 Eminent Harrovians, which was written in collaboration with Ross Beckett OBE.